Science and Technology

Researchers discover molecular link between diet and risk of colorectal cancer

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Researchers have identified a direct molecular link between meat and dairy diets and the development of antibodies in the blood that increase the chances of developing cancer. This connection may explain the high incidence of cancer among those who consume large amounts of dairy products and red meat, similar to the link between high cholesterol and an increased risk of heart disease.

Tackling alarming decline in nature requires 'safety net' of multiple, ambitious goals

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
A 'safety net' made up of multiple ambitious and interlinked goals is needed to tackle nature's alarming decline, according to an international team of researchers analyzing the new goals for biodiversity being drafted by the UN's Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Future VR could employ new ultrahigh-res display

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Repurposed solar panel research could be the foundation for a new ultrahigh-resolution microdisplay. The OLED display would feature brighter images with purer colors and more than 10,000 pixels per inch.

Ancient Maya built sophisticated water filters

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Ancient Maya in the once-bustling city of Tikal built sophisticated water filters using natural materials they imported from miles away, according to new research. A multidisciplinary team of anthropologists, geographers and biologists identified quartz and zeolite, a crystalline compound consisting of silicon and aluminum, that created a natural molecular sieve. Both minerals are used in modern water filtration.

Galactic archaeology

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Computational astrophysics study modeled for the first time faint supernovae of metal-free first stars, yielding carbon-enhanced abundance patterns for star formation. Study investigated formation of first stars and the origin of elements heavier than hydrogen, helium, lithium.

Collaboration sparks new model for ceramic conductivity

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
As insulators, metal oxides - also known as ceramics - may not seem like obvious candidates for electrical conductivity. While electrons zip back and forth in regular metals, their movement in ceramic materials is sluggish and difficult to detect.

Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Scientists have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick. The continuously twisting stacks of two-dimensional materials built by a team create new properties that scientists can exploit to study quantum physics on the nanoscale.

A promising discovery could lead to better treatment for Hepatitis C

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Virologists have identified a critical role played by a cellular protein in the progression of Hepatitis C virus infection, paving the way for more effective treatment. No vaccine currently exists for Hepatitis C virus infection, which affects more than 130 million people worldwide and nearly 250,000 Canadians. Antivirals exist but are expensive and not readily available in developing countries, where the disease is most prevalent.

Ancient origins of speed control during movement

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Movement in animals is complex. Little has been known about how spinal inhibitory interneurons work to silence other neurons and related muscle groups in coordination with the active muscle groups across changing speeds. Now a research team has discovered in a study of zebrafish that there is a very orderly relationship between when these critical inhibitory neurons are born, their participation in different speeds of movement and what part of a motor neuron they innervate.

AI detects hidden earthquakes

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Tiny movements in Earth's outermost layer may provide a Rosetta Stone for deciphering the physics and warning signs of big quakes. New algorithms that work a little like human vision are now detecting these long-hidden microquakes in the growing mountain of seismic data.

How'd we get so picky about friendship late in life? Ask the chimps

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
When humans age, they tend to favor small circles of meaningful, already established friendships rather than seek new ones. People are also more likely to lean toward positive relationships rather than ones that bring tension or conflict. These behaviors were thought to be unique to humans but it turns out chimpanzees, one of our closest living relatives, have these traits, too. The study shows what's believed to be the first evidence of nonhuman animals actively selecting who they socialize with during aging.

Upcycling polyethylene plastic waste into valuable molecules

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Researchers develop a one-pot, low temperature catalytic method to turn polyethylene polymers into alkylaromatic molecules.

Stigma impacts psychological, physical health of multiracial people

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
Policy changes can help to fight stigmas of multiracial Americans, one of the fasting growing minority groups in the United States according to a new study.

Tracer molecule may improve imaging tests for brain injury

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
Researchers have validated a new radiolabeled molecule that can be used with imaging tests to accurately detect and characterize brain injury.

Humans are born with brains 'prewired' to see words

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
Humans are born with a part of the brain that is prewired to be receptive to seeing words and letters, setting the stage at birth for people to learn how to read, a new study suggests. Analyzing brain scans of newborns, researchers found that this part of the brain - called the 'visual word form area' (VWFA) - is connected to the language network of the brain.

Individuals may legitimize hacking when angry with system or authority

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
New research has found that when individuals feel that a system or authority is unresponsive to their demands, they are more likely to legitimize hacker activity at an organization's expense.

Increasing sleep time after trauma could ease ill effects

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
Increasing the amount of time spent asleep immediately after a traumatic experience may ease any negative consequences, suggests a new study conducted by researchers. The study helps build a case for use of sleep therapeutics following trauma exposure. The finding holds promise for populations that are routinely exposed to trauma, such as military personnel and first responders, and may also benefit victims of accidents, natural disaster, violence, and abuse.

Details about broadly neutralizing antibodies provide insights for universal flu vaccine

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
New research from an immunology team may shed light on the challenges of developing a universal flu vaccine that would provide long-lasting and broad protection against influenza viruses.

Turning streetwear into solar power plants

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
Researchers have developed a material that works like a luminescent solar concentrator and can even be applied to textiles. This opens up numerous possibilities for producing energy directly where it is needed, i.e. in the use of everyday electronics.

New tool can diagnose strokes with a smartphone

Science Daily - 22/10/2020
A new tool could diagnose a stroke based on abnormalities in a patient's speech ability and facial muscular movements, and with the accuracy of an emergency room physician -- all within minutes from an interaction with a smartphone.

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