Science and Technology

Chemists develop framework to enable efficient synthesis of 'information-dense' molecules

Science Daily - 24/10/2020
Scientists have developed a theoretical approach that could ease the process of making highly complex, compact molecules. Such molecules are often found in plants and other organisms, and many are considered desirable starting points for developing potential new drugs. But they also tend to be highly challenging for chemists to construct and modify in the lab--a process called synthesis.

Stars and planets grow up together as siblings

Science Daily - 24/10/2020
ALMA shows rings around the still-growing proto-star IRS 63.

Fipronil, a common insecticide, disrupts aquatic communities in the U.S.

Science Daily - 24/10/2020
The research team found a common insecticide, fipronil, and related compounds were more toxic to stream communities than previous research has found.

Elkhorn coral actively fighting off diseases on reef

Science Daily - 24/10/2020
As the world enters a next wave of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we are aware now more than ever of the importance of a healthy immune system to protect ourselves from disease. This is not only true for humans but corals too, which are in an ongoing battle to ward off deadly diseases spreading on a reef.

Exploring the source of stars and planets in a laboratory

Science Daily - 24/10/2020
New computer simulation aims to verify a widely held but unproven theory of the source of celestial bodies.

Seabird response to abrupt climate change 5,000 years ago transformed Falklands ecosystems

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
A 14,000-year paleoecological reconstruction of the sub-Antarctic islands has found that seabird establishment occurred during a period of regional cooling 5,000 years ago. Their populations, in turn, shifted the Falkland Islands ecosystems through the deposit of high concentrations of guano that helped nourish tussac, produce peat and increase the incidence of fire.

SPOTlight supercharges cell studies

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Researchers develop a new method to isolate specific cells, and in the process find a more robust fluorescent protein.

Coastal permafrost more susceptible to climate change than previously thought

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Research has found permafrost to be mostly absent throughout the shallow seafloor along a coastal field site in northeastern Alaska. That means carbon can be released from coastline sources much more easily than previously thought.

Protective shield: Membrane-attached protein protects bacteria and chloroplasts from stress

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Stress is present everywhere, even bacteria and plant cells have to cope with it. They express various specific stress proteins, but how exactly this line of defense works is often not clear. A group of scientists has now discovered a protective mechanism in cyanobacteria as well as in chloroplasts of plant cells.

New test method to standardize immunological evaluation of nucleic acid nanoparticles

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Recent successes of several FDA-approved therapeutic nucleic acids, together with the rapid preclinical progression of nucleic acid nanoparticles (NANPs), have made it apparent that immunological effects of NANPs must be carefully assessed to permit their successful clinical translation. Based on extensive studies, a standardized protocol allowing for the assessment of NANPs' pro-inflammatory properties in validated preclinical model, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, has been developed to be highly predictive of cytokine responses.

Not all cats are grey in the dark!

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Using two mode-locked femtosecond lasers and a single photon counting detector, scientists have recorded broad spectra with close to one hundred thousand colors in almost complete darkness.

COVID-19 a double blow for chronic disease patients

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has escalated into a 'syndemic' for people with chronic illnesses, a new study analyzing data from low and middle-income countries shows.

Happiness and the evolution of brain size

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Serotonin can act as a growth factor for the stem cells in the fetal human brain that determine brain size.

Marine biology: Sponges as biomonitors of micropollution

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Sponges are filter feeders that live on particulate matter -- but they can also ingest microscopic fragments of plastics and other pollutants of anthropogenic origin. They can therefore serve as useful bioindicators of the health of marine ecosystems.

War on plastic is distracting from more urgent threats to environment, experts warn

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
A team of leading environmental experts have warned that the current war on plastic is detracting from the bigger threats to the environment.

New therapeutic approach against leukemia

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Using an RNA molecule complex, researchers can prevent retention of cancer stem cell in their tumor supporting niche.

Endangered vaquita remain genetically healthy even in low numbers

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
The critically endangered vaquita has survived in low numbers in its native Gulf of California for hundreds of thousands of years, a new genetic analysis has found. The study found little sign of inbreeding or other risks often associated with small populations.

Research team discovers molecular processes in kidney cells that attract and feed COVID-19

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
What about the kidneys make them a hotspot for COVID-19's cytokine storm? A research team says it's the presence of a protein found on specialized renal transport cells.

Extreme events in quantum cascade lasers

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
Based on a quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting mid-infrared light, the researchers developed a basic optical neuron system operating 10,000× faster than biological neurons.

Clovis people: Narrow window of tool-making

Science Daily - 23/10/2020
There is much debate surrounding the age of the Clovis -- a prehistoric culture named for stone tools found near Clovis, New Mexico in the early 1930s -- who once occupied North America during the end of the last Ice Age. New testing of bones and artifacts show that Clovis tools were made only during a brief, 300-year period from 13,050 to 12,750 years ago.

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