Science and Technology

How to thermally cloak an object

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
Can you feel the heat? To a thermal camera, which measures infrared radiation, the heat that we can feel is visible, like the heat of a traveler in an airport with a fever or the cold of a leaky window or door in the winter. Researchers report a theoretical way of mimicking thermal objects or making objects invisible to thermal measurements.

Long term use of prescription meds for insomnia not linked to better quality sleep

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
Long term use of prescription meds for insomnia doesn't seem to improve disturbed sleep in middle-aged women, suggests new research.

How fasting diets could harm future generations

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
New research which shows that fasting diets could harm the health of future generations. Fasting diets have risen in popularity in recent years, however little is known about the long-term impact of these diets, particularly for future generations. The new study reveals that reduced food intake in roundworms has a detrimental effect on three generations of offspring - particularly when those descendants have access to unlimited food.

Nature has enormous potential to fight climate change and biodiversity loss in the UK

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
A new report details how nature can be a powerful ally in responding to the twin crises of biodiversity loss and climate change.

New findings linking brain immune system to psychosis

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
New research suggests a link between psychosis and a genetic change that affects the brain's immune system. The study may impact the development of modern medicines for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

COVID-19 vaccine does not damage the placenta in pregnancy

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
A new study of placentas from patients who received the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy found no evidence of injury, adding to the growing literature that COVID-19 vaccines are safe in pregnancy.

Pregnant women hospitalized for COVID-19 infection do not face increased risk of death, new study suggests

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
Pregnant women who develop severe COVID-19 infections that require hospitalization for pneumonia and other complications may not be more likely to die from these infections than non-pregnant women. In fact, they may have significantly lower death rates than their non-pregnant counterparts.

COVID-19 alters gray matter volume in the brain, new study shows

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
COVID-19 patients who receive oxygen therapy or experience fever show reduced gray matter volume in the frontal-temporal network of the brain, according to a new study. The study's findings demonstrate changes to the frontal-temporal network could be used as a biomarker to determine the likely prognosis of COVID-19 or evaluate treatment options for the disease.

Tiny, wireless, injectable chips use ultrasound to monitor body processes

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
Researchers report that they have built what they say is the world's smallest single-chip system, consuming a total volume of less than 0.1 mm3. The system is as small as a dust mite and visible only under a microscope. In order to achieve this, the team used ultrasound to both power and communicate with the device wirelessly.

Newly described horned dinosaur from New Mexico was the earliest of its kind

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
With a frilled head and beaked face, Menefeeceratops sealeyi lived 82 million years ago, predating its relative, Triceratops.

How one of the oldest natural insecticides keeps mosquitoes away

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
A new study has identified a scent receptor in mosquitoes that helps them sniff out and avoid trace amounts of pyrethrum, a plant extract used for centuries to repel biting insects. These findings could help researchers develop new broad spectrum repellents to keep a variety of mosquito species at bay, and by extension stop them from biting people and spreading disease.

How good is your sense of smell?

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
In a new study, researchers have found a possible link between poor sense of smell and a higher risk of pneumonia hospitalization.

Engine converts random jiggling of microscopic particle into stored energy

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
Researchers have designed a remarkably fast engine that taps into a new kind of fuel -- information. This engine converts the random jiggling of a microscopic particle into stored energy. It could lead to significant advances in the speed and cost of computers and bio-nanotechnologies.

Novel circuitry solves a myriad of computationally intensive problems with minimum energy

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
Instead of relying on software to tackle computationally intensive puzzles, researchers took an unconventional approach. They created a design for an electronic hardware system that directly replicates the architecture of many types of networks.

Focus on outliers creates flawed snap judgments

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
You enter a room and quickly scan the crowd to gain a sense of who's there - how many men versus women. How reliable is your estimate? Not very, according to new research. In an experimental study, researchers found that participants consistently erred in estimating the proportion of men and women in a group. And participants erred in a particular way: They overestimated whichever group was in the minority.

People living with HIV more likely to get sick with, die from COVID-19

Science Daily - 12/05/2021
New research shows that individuals living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) -- an estimated 38 million worldwide, according to the World Health Organization -- have an increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and fatal outcomes from COVID-19.

Strong quake, small tsunami

Science Daily - 11/05/2021
The most energetic earthquakes occur where oceanic plates submerge beneath continental plates during plate tectonics. Quakes in these subduction zone settings commonly carry the risk of triggering severe tsunamis. But when the earth shook with a moment magnitude of 8.1 near the northern Chilean city of Iquique on 1 April 2014, the resulting tsunami was relatively small. A unique seismological data set provides a possible explanation.

When conservation work pays off: After 20 years, the Saker Falcon breeds again in Bulgaria

Science Daily - 11/05/2021
Considered extinct as a breeding species in the early 2000s, the Saker Falcon was recovered when the first active nest from the new history of the species in Bulgaria was discovered in 2018, built by two birds that were reintroduced back in 2015.

To enhance creativity, keep your research team fresh

Science Daily - 11/05/2021
Network scientists address the effect of team freshness on the originality and multidisciplinary impact of produced work, by systematically investigating prior collaboration relations between team members. Among other things, their study reveals that papers of fresher teams are significantly more effective than those of older teams in creating studies of higher originality and greater multidisciplinary impact.

Zoo YouTube videos prioritize entertainment over education

Science Daily - 11/05/2021
YouTube channels run by zoos focus on entertainment over education, according to a new study.

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