Science and Technology

Genes play key role in exercise outcomes

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
A new study has found that genes can explain up to 72% of the difference in outcome between people after a specific fitness exercise. The research involved data from 3,012 adults and has identified a number of specific genes which influence the outcomes of different physical activities.

The planet does not fall far from the star

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
A compositional link between planets and their respective host star has long been assumed in astronomy. Scientists now deliver empirical evidence to support the assumption -- and partly contradict it at the same time.

New metalens focuses light with ultra-deep holes

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Researchers developed a metasurface that uses very deep, very narrow holes, rather than very tall pillars, to focus light to a single spot.

Pollution’s impact on child health

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Air pollution is known to harm children's respiratory health, but its specific impacts on infection rates have remained unclear. A new analysis provides evidence of a link between the two in low-income settings, and indicates one industry may play an outsized role in the problem.

'Broken heart' syndrome is on the rise in women

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Researchers have discovered two alarming trends in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy -- also known as 'broken heart' syndrome -- a condition that is often triggered by stress or loss and can lead to long-term heart injury and impaired heart function.

Big differences found in male and female jojoba plant sex genes

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Hot desert sex has resulted in major genetic differences between male and female jojoba plants -- one of only 6 percent of plants that require a male and female plant to reproduce. New research suggests male and female jojoba plants have diverged so much, that the jojoba plant has more novel sex genes than any other known living organism. The discovery may help researchers develop a DNA test to identify male and female jojoba plants, which cannot be distinguished from each other as seedlings - and shed light on how plants adapt to environmental stress.

Aided by stem cells, a lizard regenerates a perfect tail for first time in more than 250 million years

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Lizards can regrow severed tails, making them the closest relative to humans that can regenerate a lost appendage. But in lieu of the original tail that includes a spinal column and nerves, the replacement structure is an imperfect cartilage tube. Now, a study describes how stem cells can help lizards regenerate better tails.

Early modern human from Southeast Asia adapted to a rainforest environment

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Although there has been evidence of our species living in rainforest regions in Southeast Asia from at least 70,000 years ago, the poor preservation of organic material in these regions limits how much we know about their diet and ecological adaptations to these habitats. An international team of scientists has now applied a new method to investigate the diet of fossil humans: the analysis of stable zinc isotopes from tooth enamel. This method proves particularly helpful to learn whether prehistoric humans and animals were primarily eating meat or plants.

Expansion of wind and solar power too slow to stop climate change

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
The production of renewable energy is increasing every year. But after analyzing the growth rates of wind and solar power in 60 countries, researchers conclude that virtually no country is moving sufficiently fast to avoid global warming of 1.5°C or even 2°C. The article "National growth dynamics of wind and solar power compared to the growth required for global climate targets" was published in the journal Nature Energy, written by Aleh Cherp, Vadim Vinichenko, Jale Tosun, Joel A.Gordon and Jessica Jewell.

Scientists develop fully solar-driven autonomous chemical mini-plant

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Scientists have developed a fully operational standalone solar-powered mini-reactor which offers the potential for the production of fine chemicals in remote locations on Earth, and possibly even on Mars.

Study discovers unique brain signature of intimate partner aggression

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
A new study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the brain activity of 51 male-female romantic couples as they experienced intimate partner aggression in real time. They found that aggression toward intimate partners was associated with aberrant activity in the brain's medial prefrontal cortex, or MPFC, which has many functions, but among them is the ability to foster perceptions of closeness with and value of other people.

New technique helps researchers understand how acid damages teeth

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Researchers have developed a new technique to improve understanding of how acid damages teeth at the microstructural level.

Mammals on the menu: Snake dietary diversity exploded after mass extinction 66 million years ago

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Modern snakes evolved from ancestors that lived side by side with the dinosaurs and that likely fed mainly on insects and lizards.

Mito warriors: Scientists discover how T cell assassins reload their weapons to kill and kill again

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Researchers have discovered how T cells -- an important component of our immune system -- are able keep on killing as they hunt down and kill cancer cells, repeatedly reloading their toxic weapons.

Study explores the decisions made by physicians in the delivery room, and why they may be making them

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Clinical decisions made in the delivery setting as to whether to employ vaginal delivery or cesarean section are often made under high pressure, and with great uncertainty, and have serious consequences for mother and baby. Now, a new study of electronic health records spanning 86,000 deliveries suggests that if their prior patient had complications in one delivery mode, a physician will be more likely to switch to the other -- and likely inappropriate -- delivery mode for the subsequent patient, regardless of whether it is warranted for that patient's indications.

Filling the gaps: Connecting genes to diseases through proteins

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Hundreds of connections between different human diseases have been uncovered through their shared origin in our genome, challenging the categorization of diseases by organ, symptoms, or clinical specialty. A new study has generated data on thousands of proteins circulating in our blood and combined this with genetic data to produce a map showing how genetic differences that affect these proteins link together seemingly diverse as well as related diseases.

Many US adults worry about facial image data in healthcare settings

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Uses of facial images and facial recognition technologies -- to unlock a phone or in airport security -- are becoming increasingly common in everyday life. But how do people feel about using such data in healthcare and biomedical research?

Shedding light on mysterious jellyfish diets

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
Jellyfish have voracious appetites, and they aren't considered the most selective eaters. Almost anything that gets stuck to their tentacles winds up in the gelatinous sack that they use to digest their food. This 'take what comes' feeding strategy has clouded our understanding of which foods jellyfish survive on and how they fit in food webs. However, new research using two biochemical tools, stable isotopes and fatty acids, are beginning to unlocking the secrets of jellyfish feeding.

Brain ‘noise’ may hold the keys to psychiatric treatment efficacy

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
It remains a central challenge in psychiatry to reliably judge whether a patient will respond to treatment. Researchers now show that moment-to-moment fluctuations in brain activity can reliably predict whether patients with social anxiety disorder will be receptive to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

The gene behind an unusual form of Cushing’s Syndrome

Science Daily - 14/10/2021
The molecular causes of a particular type of food-dependent Cushing's Syndrome, a rare disease of the adrenal glands, are finally revealed.

Pages

Subscribe to Shree Sarvajanik Kelavani Mandal aggregator - Science and Technology