Science and Technology

As climates change, prepare for more mosquitoes in winter

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
In places on the front lines of climate change, these disease-spreading insects may become a year-round problem.

More than a bumpy ride: Turbulence offers boost to birds

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
By combining wind speed data with the measured accelerations of a golden eagle outfitted with GPS tracking instruments, researchers suggest that, rather than hindering flight, turbulence is a source of energy that birds may use to their advantage.

Harmful protein waste in the muscle

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
An international research team identified the cause of a rare muscle disease. According to these findings, a single spontaneously occurring mutation results in the muscle cells no longer being able to correctly break down defective proteins. The condition causes severe heart failure in children, accompanied by skeletal and respiratory muscle damage. The study also highlights experimental approaches for potential treatment. Whether this hope will be fulfilled, however, will only become clear in a few years.

Does zinc inhibit or promote growth of kidney stones? Well, both

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
In the first study to validate conflicting theories, a researcher has confirmed that the zinc actually does inhibit and promote the growth of kidney stones at the same time.

Dark matter is slowing the spin of the Milky Way's galactic bar

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
For 30 years, astrophysicists have predicted such a slowdown, but this is the first time it has been measured. The researchers say it gives a new type of insight into the nature of dark matter, which acts like a counterweight slowing the spin.

Rocky mountain forests now burning more than any point in past 2,000 years

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Following 2020's extreme fire season, high-elevation forests in the central Rocky Mountains now are burning more than at any point in the past 2,000 years, according to a new study.

Biodiversity 'hotspots' imperiled along California's streams

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
A study of woodland ecosystems that provide habitat for rare, endangered species along streams, rivers throughout California reveals some ecologically important areas are inadvertently benefiting from water humans are diverting for their own needs. Though it seems a short-term boon to these ecosystems, the artificial supply creates an unintended dependence on its bounty, threatens the long-term survival of natural communities and spotlights the need for changes in the way water is managed across the state.

Early migrations of Siberians to America tracked using bacterial population structures

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Early migrations of humans to the Americas from Siberia around 12,000 years ago have been traced using the bacteria they carried by an international team.

Boundary of heliosphere mapped

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
For the first time, the boundary of the heliosphere has been mapped, giving scientists a better understanding of how solar and interstellar winds interact.

Making a meal of DNA in the seafloor

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialized microbes. An international team of researchers has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source. One bacterium newly named by the team in fact is a true expert in degrading DNA.

Near-field routing of hyperbolic metamaterials

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Researchers recently demonstrated an all-electric scheme able to flexibly control the propagation direction of near-field light.

Insulators turn up the heat on quantum bits

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Physicists have long suspected that dielectric materials may significantly disrupt ion-trap quantum computers. Now, researcher have developed a new method to quantify this source of error for the first time. For the future operation of quantum computers with very many quantum bits, such noise sources need to be eliminated already during the design process if possible.

Persistence pays off in the human gut microbiome

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
The human gut microbiome is a complex community of trillions of microbes that are constantly interacting with each other and our bodies. It supports our wellbeing, immune system and mental health -- but how is it sustained?

An unusual symbiosis of a ciliate, green alga, and purple bacterium

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
The intracellular purple sulfur bacterium 'Candidatus Thiodictyon intracellulare' has lost the ability to oxidize sulfur and now supplies a ciliate with energy from photosynthesis.

Climate conditions during the migration of Homo sapiens out of Africa reconstructed

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Climate reconstruction of the last 200,000 years from East Africa illustrates the living conditions of Homo sapiens when they migrated out of Africa / Homo sapiens was mobile across regions during wet phases and retreated to high altitudes during dry phases.

The evolution of good taste

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Does evolution explain why we can't resist a salty chip? Researchers found that differences between the elemental composition of foods and the elemental needs of animals can explain the development of pleasing tastes like salty, umami and sweet.

New combination of materials provides progress toward quantum computing

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Engineers have demonstrated how, when the TMDC materials they make are stacked in a particular geometry, the interaction that occurs between particles gives researchers more control over the devices' properties. Specifically, the interaction between electrons becomes so strong that they form a new structure known as a correlated insulating state. This is an important step, researchers said, toward developing quantum emitters needed for future quantum simulation and computing.

Researchers model impact of blood pressure control programs at barbershops nationwide

Science Daily - 15/06/2021
Investigators built a model to examine the potential impact of implementing blood pressure control programs at barbershops nationwide and found that such programs could reach one in three Black men with uncontrolled blood pressure nationally.

Scientists expose the cold heart of landfalling hurricanes

Science Daily - 14/06/2021
Fearsome and powerful, hurricanes can wreak massive destruction when they hit land. But while most hurricanes then weaken, others can strengthen again into extratropical cyclones and caused further damage inland. Now, researchers have used simulations to uncover the presence of a cold core inside decaying hurricanes - an unexpected discovery that could help forecasters predict the level of extreme weather that communities farther inland may face.

Peering inside 2D crystal synthesis

Science Daily - 14/06/2021
Theorists simulate the molecular transitions that take place inside a furnace to create 2D molybdenum disulfide, a semiconductor that could find a home in next-generation electronics.

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