Science and Technology

Natural hazards threaten over three thousand species

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Natural hazards can speed up the extinction process of land animals that have limited distribution and/or small populations. But there is hope to turn the negative development around, says researchers behind new study.

Restored rat-free islands could support hundreds of thousands more breeding seabirds

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Archipelago case-study shows that removing invasive rats and restoring native vegetation could help bring back hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs of seabirds lost to tropical islands. Calculating that there are enough fish to sustain restored seabird populations should be an important consideration for restoration projects, scientists say. Restored seabird populations also provide huge boost to the health of surrounding coral reef ecosystems through restored nutrient cycles.

Blood markers detect rare forms of dementia as well as the neurological diseases ALS and PSP

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
In a study with 991 adults, scientists show that the most common forms of frontotemporal dementia as well as the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and progressive supranuclear palsy can be recognized by blood testing.

Unveiling Telo-seq: A breakthrough in telomere research on aging and cancer

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Telo-seq -- a new tool -- is bringing telomere science into its modern era. Scientists can finally explore questions about the role of telomeres in aging and cancer that were not accessible with previous methods. The findings will inspire novel telomere-targeting therapeutics for aging-related diseases.

The 'Queen of the Night' does not whistle

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Opera singers have to use the extreme limits of their voice range. Many pedagogical and scientific sources suggest that the highest pitches reached in classical singing can only be produced with a so-called 'whistle' voice register, in analogy to ultrasonic vocalizations of mice and rats. An international research team has now rejected this assumption. In their study, the scientists showed that the high-frequency sounds of operatic sopranos are produced with the same principle than speech and most other forms of singing.

Large wildfires create weather that favors more fire

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
A new study shows soot from large wildfires in California traps sunlight, making days warmer and drier than they ought to be.

Sepsis patients could get the right treatment faster, based on their genes

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
New study into the molecular pathways involved in sepsis is one step closer to rapid and targeted treatment of patients. New study into the molecular pathways involved in sepsis is one step closer to rapid and targeted treatment of patients.

Promising drug target for treating osteoporosis

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Osteoporosis or the weakening of bones makes the aging population vulnerable to fractures and a decreased quality of life. The parathyroid hormone (PTH)-derived peptide -- teriparatide has demonstrated strong bone promoting effects. However, it is also to known to exert bone-resorbing effects. A new study uncovers a novel PTH-inducible target gene -- Gprc5a which suppresses the proliferation and differentiation of 'osteoblasts' or bone-forming cells, and may serve as a therapeutic target in the treatment of osteoporosis.

Breakthrough may clear major hurdle for quantum computers

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
The potential of quantum computers is currently thwarted by a trade-off problem. Quantum systems that can carry out complex operations are less tolerant to errors and noise, while systems that are more protected against noise are harder and slower to compute with. Now a research team has created a unique system that combats the dilemma, thus paving the way for longer computation time and more robust quantum computers.

Researchers film energy materials as they form

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Shooting a movie in the lab requires special equipment. Especially when the actors are molecules -- invisible to the naked eye -- reacting with each other. 'Imagine trying to film tiny lava flows during a volcanic eruption. Your smartphone camera wouldn't be up to the job.

Where to put head and tail?

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Formation of the body axes is a critical part of embryonic development. They guarantee that all body parts end up where they belong and that no ears grow on our backs. The head-tail axis, for example, determines the orientation of the two ends of the body. It was previously assumed that this axis is largely determined by the interplay between the Nodal and BMP signals. However, there appears to be another player in this system, as researchers have now discovered by using an embryo-like model system they developed. In the absence of BMP, the signalling molecule beta-catenin takes on the role of the Nodal antagonist. This new mechanism could be a flexible solution for axis formation in embryos with different shapes.

Astronomers see a massive black hole awaken in real time

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
In late 2019 the previously unremarkable galaxy SDSS1335+0728 suddenly started shining brighter than ever before. To understand why, astronomers have used data from several space and ground-based observatories, including the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT), to track how the galaxy's brightness has varied. In a study out today, they conclude that they are witnessing changes never seen before in a galaxy -- likely the result of the sudden awakening of the massive black hole at its core.

Advanced artificial intelligence: A revolution for sustainable agriculture

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
The rise of advanced artificial intelligence (edge AI) could well mark the beginning of a new era for sustainable agriculture. A recent study proposes a roadmap for integrating this technology into farming practices. The aim? To improve the efficiency, quality and safety of agricultural production, while addressing a range of environmental, social and economic challenges.

Over-the-counter supplement improves walking for peripheral artery disease patients

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
The over-the-counter supplement nicotinamide riboside, a form of vitamin B3, increased the walking endurance of patients with peripheral artery disease, a chronic leg condition for which there are few effective treatments.

Surprising origins for a rare cancer

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
An unexpected discovery may pave the way to better treatments for a broad range of cancers.

Blood test could predict Parkinson's seven years before symptoms

Science Daily - 18/06/2024
Scientists have developed a simple blood test that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to predict Parkinson's up to seven years before the onset of symptoms.

AI can help shipping industry cut down emissions, report says

The Hindu:Science - 18/06/2024
Shipping, responsible for moving about 90% of global trade, contributes nearly 3% to the world's carbon dioxide emissions

More than 800 coal plants worldwide could be profitably decommissioned, research group says

The Hindu:Science - 18/06/2024
Around 15.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide are generated every year by 2,000 gigawatts of coal power

India's 'heat trap' cities make summers worse, says government official

The Hindu:Science - 18/06/2024
The IMD has forecast above-normal temperatures for June in the northwest and central parts of the country including Delhi

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