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Deeper understanding of malaria parasite development unlocks opportunities to block disease spread

02/05/2024
Natural malaria infections have been genetically analysed at a higher resolution than ever before, giving insights that could help understand and block transmission.

Synchronization between central circadian clock and circadian clocks of tissues preserves their functioning

02/05/2024
Two complementary research articles reveal that central and peripheral circadian clocks coordinate to regulate the daily activity of skin and muscles. The coordination between the two clocks (central and peripheral) guarantees 50% of the circadian functions of tissues, including vital processes such as the cell cycle, DNA repair, mitochondrial activity, and metabolism. Synchronization between the central brain clock and peripheral ones prevents premature muscle aging and improves muscle function, suggesting new strategies to tackle age-related decline through circadian rhythm modulation.

When working out, males are programmed to burn more fat, while females recycle it--at least in rats

02/05/2024
Vigorous exercise burns fat more in males than in females, but the benefits of exercise are broad for everyone.

Random robots are more reliable

02/05/2024
New algorithm encourages robots to move more randomly to collect more diverse data for learning. In tests, robots started with no knowledge and then learned and correctly performed tasks within a single attempt. New model could improve safety and practicality of self-driving cars, delivery drones and more.

Significant new discovery in teleportation research -- Noise can improve the quality of quantum teleportation

02/05/2024
Researchers succeeded in conducting an almost perfect quantum teleportation despite the presence of noise that usually disrupts the transfer of quantum state.

New approach in the synthesis of complex natural substances

02/05/2024
Many natural substances possess interesting characteristics, and can form the basis of new active compounds in medicine. Terpenes, for example, are a group of substances, some of which are already used in therapies against cancer, malaria or epilepsy. They are found as fragrances in cosmetics or as flavorings in food, and form the basis of new medications: Terpenes are natural substances that occur in plants, insects and sea sponges. They are difficult to produce synthetically. However, chemists are now introducing a new method of synthesis.

New sensor detects errors in MRI scans

02/05/2024
A new prototype sensor is capable of detecting errors in MRI scans using laser light and gas. The new sensor can thereby do what is impossible for current electrical sensors -- and hopefully pave the way for MRI scans that are better, cheaper and faster.

Toxic chemicals can be detected with new AI method

02/05/2024
Researchers have developed an AI method that improves the identification of toxic chemicals -- based solely on knowledge of the molecular structure. The method can contribute to better control and understanding of the ever-growing number of chemicals used in society, and can also help reduce the amount of animal tests.

Researchers create new chemical compound to solve 120-year-old problem

02/05/2024
Chemists have created a highly reactive chemical compound that has eluded scientists for more than 120 years. The discovery could lead to new drug treatments, safer agricultural products, and better electronics.

Unveiling a polarized world -- in a single shot

02/05/2024
Researchers have developed a compact, single-shot polarization imaging system that can provide a complete picture of polarization. By using just two thin metasurfaces, the imaging system could unlock the vast potential of polarization imaging for a range of existing and new applications, including biomedical imaging, augmented and virtual reality systems and smart phones.

Activation of innate immunity: Important piece of the puzzle identified

02/05/2024
Researchers have deciphered the complex interplay of various enzymes around the innate immune receptor toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), which plays an important role in defending our bodies against viruses.

Gene signatures from tissue-resident T cells as a predictive tool for melanoma patients

02/05/2024
A new study has revealed an association between favorable survival outcomes for melanoma patients and the presence of higher populations of tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM). Data obtained from this study could be used not only for a TRM-based machine learning model with predictive powers for melanoma prognosis but could also elucidate the role TRM cells can play in the tumor immune microenvironment. This could guide the development of more effective and personalized anti-tumor immunotherapeutic treatment regimens for cancer patients.

To bend the curve of biodiversity loss, nature recovery must be integrated across all sectors

02/05/2024
The alarming rates of biodiversity loss worldwide have made clear that the classical way of governing biodiversity recovery based on protected areas and programs for the protection of endangered species is not enough. To tackle this, almost 200 countries committed to the active 'mainstreaming' or integration of biodiversity targets into policies and plans across relevant sectors. However, research suggests that this has until now been largely ineffective due to non-binding commitments, vaguely formulated targets, 'add-on' biodiversity initiatives, and too few resources. 'Top down regulation is also needed,' say the authors.

This highly reflective black paint makes objects more visible to autonomous cars

02/05/2024
Driving at night might be a scary challenge for a new driver, but with hours of practice it soon becomes second nature. For self-driving cars, however, practice may not be enough because the lidar sensors that often act as these vehicles' 'eyes' have difficulty detecting dark-colored objects. New research describes a highly reflective black paint that could help these cars see dark objects and make autonomous driving safer.

Malaria may shorten leukocyte telomeres among sub-Saharan Africans

02/05/2024
The length of telomeres in white blood cells, known as leukocytes, varies significantly among sub-Saharan African populations, researchers report. Moreover, leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is negatively associated with malaria endemicity and only partly explained by genetic factors.

Companies may buy consumer genetic information despite its modest predictive power

02/05/2024
Genetics can be associated with one's behavior and health -- from the willingness to take risks, and how long one stays in school, to chances of developing Alzheimer's disease and breast cancer. Although our fate is surely not written in our genes, corporations may still find genetic data valuable for risk assessment and business profits, according to a perspective article. The researchers stress the need for policy safeguards to address ethics and policy concerns regarding collecting genetic data.

Wild orangutan treats wound with pain-relieving plant

02/05/2024
A wild orangutan was observed applying a plant with known medicinal properties to a wound, a first for a wild animal.

How the brain's arousal center helps control visual attention too

02/05/2024
Neuroscientists have artificially increased neuronal activity in part of the brain by briefly shining light on genetically modified neurons. They saw that this manipulation selectively enhanced performance in non-human primates performing a visual attention task, underscoring the crucial role that attention plays in sensory perception.

Artificial intelligence enhances monitoring of threatened marbled murrelet

02/05/2024
Artificial intelligence analysis of data gathered by acoustic recording devices is a promising new tool for monitoring the marbled murrelet and other secretive, hard-to-study species.

Scientists identify new treatment target for leading cause of blindness

02/05/2024
Scientists report that a gene previously implicated in the development of atherosclerotic lesions in coronary arteries could be key to understanding why many people don't benefit from the most used therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness.

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