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Self-critical perfectionism gnaws on students' well-being already in lower secondary school

06/05/2024
A new study among ninth-graders attending lower secondary school in Swedish-speaking areas of Finland identified four perfectionistic profiles with varying associations with students' psychological well-being.

Contract treatment reduces recidivism and substance-related adverse health events

06/05/2024
Substance use disorder treatment in the community is a superior alternative to incarceration for offenders with a substance misuse background, according to a recent study evaluating the effectiveness of the contract treatment sanction in Sweden.

High-pressure spectroscopy: Why 3,000 bars are needed to take a comprehensive look at a protein

06/05/2024
Why 3,000 bars are needed to take a comprehensive look at a protein: Researchers present a new high-pressure spectroscopy method to unravel the properties of proteins' native structures.

VR may pose privacy risks for kids: A new study finds parents aren't as worried as they should be

06/05/2024
New research finds that, while an increasing number of minors are using virtual reality (VR) apps, not many parents recognize the extent of the security and privacy risks that are specific to VR technologies. The study also found that few parents are taking active steps to address those security and privacy issues, such as using parental controls built into the apps.

Participants of pioneering CRISPR gene editing trial see vision improve

06/05/2024
About 79% of clinical trial participants experienced measurable improvement after receiving experimental, CRISPR-based gene editing that is designed to fix a rare form of blindness, according to a new article.

Improved nutrition, sanitation linked to beneficial changes in child stress and epigenetic programming

06/05/2024
A new study provides some of the clearest and most comprehensive evidence to date on what is known about stress physiology and 'epigenetic programming.'

Astronomers observe elusive stellar light surrounding ancient quasars

06/05/2024
Astronomers observed the elusive starlight surrounding some of the earliest quasars in the universe. The findings may shed light on how the earliest supermassive black holes became so massive despite having a relatively short amount of cosmic time in which to grow.

AI to make crop production more sustainable

06/05/2024
Drones monitoring fields for weeds and robots targeting and treating crop diseases may sound like science fiction but is actually happening already, at least on some experimental farms. Researchers are working on driving forward the smart digitalization of agriculture and have now published a list of the research questions that will need to be tackled as a priority in the future.

Lake tsunamis pose significant threat under warming climate

06/05/2024
The names might not be familiar -- Cowee Creek, Brabazon Range, Upper Pederson Lagoon -- but they mark the sites of recent lake tsunamis, a phenomenon that is increasingly common in Alaska, British Columbia and other regions with mountain glaciers. Triggered by landslides into small bodies of water, most of these tsunamis have occurred in remote locations so far, but geologists say it may just be a matter of time before a tsunami swamps a more populated place.

Hubble views a galaxy with a voracious black hole

06/05/2024
Bright, starry spiral arms surround an active galactic center in a new NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the galaxy NGC 4951. Located in the Virgo constellation, NGC 4951 is located roughly 50 million light-years away from Earth. It's classified as a Seyfert galaxy, which means that it's an extremely energetic type of galaxy with an active galactic nucleus (AGN).

New discoveries about Jupiter's magnetosphere

06/05/2024
New discoveries about Jupiter could lead to a better understanding of Earth's own space environment and influence a long-running scientific debate about the solar system's largest planet.

New study reveals age-related brain changes influence recovery after stroke

06/05/2024
A new study has revealed that areas of age-related damage in the brain relate to motor outcomes after a stroke -- a phenomenon that may be under-recognized in stroke research. The new observational study looked at the relationship between stroke recovery and white matter hyper-intensities (WMHs) -- areas of age-related damage in the brain's white matter, which represent vascular dysfunction and are known to impact cognitive functions.

A better way to ride a motorcycle

06/05/2024
Motorcycles are designed to accommodate the average-sized rider, leaving taller and shorter riders vulnerable to discomfort.

Biomechanical dataset for badminton performance analysis

06/05/2024
In the sports industry, player data collection aids in personalized training feedback. Researchers have now gathered a detailed dataset and laid the foundation for delivering coaching assistance and feedback through the same. Utilizing wearable sensors and machine learning, their dataset offers real-time feedback and optimized movement suggestions. With over 7,763 badminton swings analyzed, stroke quality assessment offers valuable insights, making badminton training more accessible and affordable.

Sister cities can help communities better navigate the climate crisis

04/05/2024
Anthropologists suggest in a new study that establishing networks of 'sister cities' dedicated to addressing the impact of natural disasters can mitigate the devastation wrought by climate change.

Aligned peptide 'noodles' could enable lab-grown biological tissues

04/05/2024
Researchers have developed peptide-based hydrogels that mimic the aligned structure of muscle and nerve tissues, which could enable the development of functional lab-grown tissue.

Quantifying U.S. health impacts from gas stoves

04/05/2024
A new study of air pollution in U.S. homes reveals how much gas and propane stoves increase people's exposure to nitrogen dioxide, a pollutant linked to childhood asthma. Even in bedrooms far from kitchens, concentrations frequently exceed health limits while stoves are on and for hours after burners and ovens are turned off.

Physics confirms that the enemy of your enemy is, indeed, your friend

04/05/2024
The famous axiom 'the enemy of my enemy is my friend' is part of Austrian psychologist Fritz Heider's social balance theory, introduced in the 1940s. Previous studies have tried to model social networks based in famous theory but results remained controversial. New model takes into account two key pieces simultaneously: Not everyone knows everyone else in a social network, and some people are friendlier than others. With those two constraints, large-scale social networks consistently align with social balance theory. Model has broad applications for exploring political polarization, neural networks, drug interactions and more.

Stony coral tissue loss disease is shifting the ecological balance of Caribbean reefs

04/05/2024
A new study shows stony coral tissue loss disease is causing drastic changes in the Caribbean's population of corals, which is sure to disrupt the delicate balance of the ecosystem and threaten marine biodiversity and coastal economies.

Newly discovered mechanism of T-cell control can interfere with cancer immunotherapies

04/05/2024
Activated T cells that carry a certain marker protein on their surface are controlled by natural killer (NK) cells, another cell type of the immune system. In this way, the body presumably curbs destructive immune reactions. Researchers have now discovered that NK cells can impair the effect of cancer therapies with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) in this way. They could also be responsible for the rapid decline of therapeutic CAR-T cells. Interventions in this mechanism could potentially improve the efficacy of these cellular cancer immunotherapies.

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