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Humans did not cause woolly mammoths to go extinct -- climate change did

20/10/2021
Humans did not cause woolly mammoths to go extinct -- climate change did. For five million years, woolly mammoths roamed the earth until they vanished for good nearly 4,000 years ago -- and scientists have finally proved why. The hairy cousins of today's elephants lived alongside early humans and were a regular staple of their diet -- their skeletons were used to build shelters, harpoons were carved from their giant tusks, artwork featuring them is daubed on cave walls, and 30,000 years ago, the oldest known musical instrument, a flute, was made out of a mammoth bone.

Unmasking the magic of superconductivity in twisted graphene

20/10/2021
Researchers report an uncanny resemblance between the superconductivity of magic graphene and that of high temperature superconductors. Magic graphene may hold the key to unlocking new mechanisms of superconductivity, including high temperature superconductivity.

Lightweight electric wristband heaters for constant, portable warmth

20/10/2021
As the fall chill settles in across the U.S., people are getting out their cozy sweaters and electric blankets, or stocking up on handheld heat packets for extra warmth. But sweaters and blankets are bulky, and heat packs only work for a little while. Now, researchers demonstrate a conductive, durable yarn for lightweight wearable heaters that are re-usable and provide constant, portable warmth.

Treatment enhances anti-leukemia effect of bone marrow transplant, reduces recurrence, study finds

20/10/2021
Researchers have identified a drug that, when given along with a bone marrow transplant, drops the risk of leukemia recurring by 20% among the high-risk patients.

Depression: Magnetic seizure therapy may be attractive alternative to electricity

20/10/2021
An international research team investigated whether continued magnetic seizure therapy might effectively prevent the relapse of treatment-resistant depression, compared to what is known about electroconvulsive therapy, the current standard of care.

Zapping untreated water gets rid of more waterborne viruses

20/10/2021
Using sophisticated microscopy and computational analysis, researchers have now validated the merit of a water purification technology that uses electricity to remove and inactivate an assortment of waterborne viruses. They said the yet-to-be-implemented water purification strategy could add another level of safety against pathogens that cause gastrointestinal ailments and other infections in humans.

Plugging into ocean waves with a flexible, seaweed-like generator

20/10/2021
Ocean waves can be powerful, containing enough energy to push around sand, pebbles and even boulders during storms. These waves, as well as smaller, more gentle ones, could be tapped as a source of renewable energy. Now, researchers have developed flexible power generators that mimic the way seaweed sways to efficiently convert surface and underwater waves into electricity to power marine-based devices.

Depression, anxiety may be linked to c-section risk among pregnant women

20/10/2021
Depression and anxiety in pregnant women may be connected to the type of delivery they have, new research suggests.

Male-female differences in heart disease could start before birth

20/10/2021
New research suggests that male-female differences in protein expression occur immediately after embryonic cells become heart cells called cardiomyocytes. This is the earliest stage of heart development, well before the embryo is exposed to sex hormones.

Large-scale census of coral heat tolerance

20/10/2021
Florida's critically endangered staghorn corals were surveyed to discover which ones can better withstand future heatwaves in the ocean. Insights from the study help organizations working to restore climate-resilient reefs in Florida and provide a blueprint for the success of restoration projects globally.

New deep learning algorithm can pick up genetic mutations and DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancers more efficiently

20/10/2021
A new deep learning algorithm can pick up the molecular pathways and development of key mutations causing colorectal cancer more accurately than existing methods, meaning patients could benefit from targeted therapies with quicker turnaround times and at a lower cost.

Personalized clotting profiles may help in next generation of precision heart disease treatments

20/10/2021
People at risk from strokes and heart attacks could benefit from personalized clotting profiles to help clinicians prescribe more precise treatments, thanks to new research.

Urban wastes used as fertilizers contain higher PFAS than livestock manure

20/10/2021
Because of their useful surfactant properties, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been massively produced for non-stick coatings, water-repellant fabrics and firefighting foams. However, scientists have detected these highly stable 'forever chemicals' throughout the environment, prompting toxicity concerns. Now, researchers have characterized PFAS in contemporary and historical organic waste products applied to agricultural fields in France, finding the highest amounts in urban samples, with compounds changing over time.

What’s missing from forest mortality projections? A look underground

20/10/2021
You can't see it happening. But what goes on below ground in a forest is very important in determining its fate. In a study, scientists conclude that the sideways flow of water through soil can have an important impact on how riparian forests respond to climate change. Models used to predict the future plight of forests typically don't account for this factor -- but they should, researchers say.

Maintaining balance in the brain

20/10/2021
Researchers uncovered that reducing levels of the protein tau, which is known for its role in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions, changes excitatory and inhibitory cells in ways that make it harder for the brain to burst with overexcitation.

New cancer treatment may reawaken the immune system

20/10/2021
Researchers have discovered a new way to jump-start the immune system to attack tumors, which could allow cancer immunotherapy to be used against more types of cancer.

Arctic krill use twilight to guide their daily rhythms through the polar winter

20/10/2021
Most animals sync their body clocks to the daily rhythm of the sun, but what happens during the polar winter when the sun never rises above the horizon? According to a new study, arctic krill can detect tiny changes in light intensity during polar winter days, allowing them to maintain their daily biological rhythms.

AI helping to quantify enzyme activity

20/10/2021
Enzymes are biological catalysts that facilitate biochemical transformations. An international team of bioinformatics researchers has developed a new process for predicting Michaelis constants, which determine reaction kinetics.

Genomic study revealing among diverse populations with inherited retinal disease

20/10/2021
An international team of researchers has broadened and deepened understanding of how inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) affect different populations of people and, in the process, have identified new gene variants that may cause the diseases.

New study characterizes the gut virome

20/10/2021
A new study has added numerous previously uncharacterized viral genomes and genes to the ever-increasing worldwide pool of human gut viromes. The study will prove helpful in investigating the role of the gut virome in human health and disease.

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