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Electric delivery vehicles: When, where, how they’re charged has big impact on greenhouse gas emissions

12/07/2021
The transportation sector is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, and a lot of attention has been devoted to electric passenger vehicles and their potential to help reduce those emissions.

Novel screening approach improves diagnosis of metabolic disorders in newborns

12/07/2021
A screening method known as untargeted metabolomics profiling can improve the diagnostic rate for inborn errors of metabolism, a group of rare genetic conditions, by about seven-fold when compared to the traditional metabolic screening approach.

The fine nose of storks

12/07/2021
The sharp eyes of an eagle, the extraordinary hearing of an owl - to successfully find food, the eyes and ears of birds have adapted optimally to their living conditions. Until now, the sense of smell has played a rather subordinate role. When meadows are freshly mowed, storks often appear there to search for snails and frogs. Researchers have now studied the birds' behavior and discovered that the storks are attracted by the smell of the mown grass. Only storks that were downwind and could thus perceive the smell reacted to the mowing. The scientists also sprayed a meadow with a spray of green leaf scents released during mowing. Storks appeared here as well. This shows that white storks use their sense of smell to forage and suggests that the sense of smell may also play a greater role in other birds than previously thought.

You can snuggle wolf pups all you want, they still won't 'get' you quite like your dog

12/07/2021
You know your dog gets your gist when you point and say 'go find the ball' and he scampers right to it. This knack for understanding human gestures may seem unremarkable, but it's a complex cognitive ability that is rare in the animal kingdom. New research comparing dog puppies to human-reared wolf pups offers some clues to how dogs' unusual people-reading skills came to be.

Teardrop star reveals hidden supernova doom

12/07/2021
Astronomers have made the rare sighting of two stars spiralling to their doom by spotting the tell-tale signs of a teardrop-shaped star.

'Clock' created to predict immunological health and chronic diseases of aging

12/07/2021
Researchers have created an inflammatory clock of aging (iAge) which measures inflammatory load and predicts multi-morbidity, frailty, immune health, cardiovascular aging and is also associated with exceptional longevity in centenarians.

Coastal ecosystems worldwide: Billion-dollar carbon reservoirs

12/07/2021
Australia's coastal ecosystems alone save the rest of the world costs of around 23 billion US dollar a year by absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere. Coastal ecosystems such as seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangrove forests make an important contribution to mitigating climate change.

Haziness of exoplanet atmospheres depends on properties of aerosol particles

12/07/2021
Many exoplanets have opaque atmospheres, obscured by clouds or hazes that make it hard for astronomers to characterize their chemical compositions. A new study shows that haze particles produced under different conditions have a wide range of properties that can determine how clear or hazy a planet's atmosphere is likely to be.

A fermented-food diet increases microbiome diversity and lowers inflammation, study finds

12/07/2021
A diet rich in fermented foods enhances the diversity of gut microbes and decreases molecular signs of inflammation, according to researchers.

Technology that restores the sense of touch in nerves damaged as a result of injury

12/07/2021
Researchers have developed a sensor that can be implanted anywhere in the body -- for example, under the tip of a severed finger. The sensor connects to another nerve that functions properly and restores tactile sensation to the injured nerve. The development is biocompatible and does not require electricity, wires, or batteries.

Ecologists develop a novel forensic tool for detecting laundering of critically endangered cockatoos

12/07/2021
Ecologists have applied stable isotope techniques to determine whether birds in the pet trade are captive or wild-caught, a key piece of evidence required in many cases to determine whether a trade is legal or not. They have applied this technique to the yellow-crested cockatoo, a critically endangered species from Indonesia/Timor-Leste with a global population of fewer than 2,500.

Let crop residues rot in the field -- it's a climate win

12/07/2021
Plant material that lies to rot in soil isn't just valuable as compost. In fact, agricultural crop residue plays a crucial role in sequestering carbon, which is vital for reducing global CO2 emissions.

Human environmental genome recovered in the absence of skeletal remains

12/07/2021
Ancient sediments from caves have already proven to preserve DNA for thousands of years. The amount of recovered sequences from environmental sediments, however, is generally low, which complicates analyses. A study has now successfully retrieved three mammalian environmental genomes from a single soil sample of 25,000 years BP obtained from the cave of Satsurblia in the Caucasus (Georgia).

How the universe is reflected near black holes

12/07/2021
In the vicinity of black holes, space is so warped that even light rays may curve around them several times. This phenomenon may enable us to see multiple versions of the same thing. While this has been known for decades, only now do we have an exact, mathematical expression.

Mathematicians develop ground-breaking modeling toolkit to predict local COVID-19 impact

12/07/2021
Mathematicians have created a new modeling toolkit which predicts the impact of COVID-19 at a local level with unprecedented accuracy.

Rise in Southeast Asia forest clearance increasing greenhouse gases

12/07/2021
Forest clearance in Southeast Asia is accelerating, leading to unprecedented increases in carbon emissions, according to new research. The findings show that forests are being cut down at increasingly higher altitudes and on steeper slopes in order to make way for agricultural intensification.

Preferred life expectancy and its association with hypothetical adverse life scenarios

12/07/2021
A new study sheds light on how the specter of dementia and chronic pain reduce people's desire to live into older ages. Among Norwegians 60 years of age and older the desire to live into advanced ages was significantly reduced by hypothetical adverse life scenarios with the strongest effect caused by dementia and chronic pain.

Sea-level rise may worsen existing San Francisco Bay Area inequities

12/07/2021
Researchers examined the number of households unable to pay for damages from coastal flooding to reveal how sea-level rise could threaten the fabric of Bay Area communities over the next 40 years.

People given 'friendly' bacteria in nose drops protected against meningitis, study suggests

12/07/2021
A recent trial has shown that nose drops of modified 'friendly' bacteria may protect against meningitis.

Sensing 'junk' RNA after chemotherapy enhances blood regeneration

12/07/2021
Scientists reveal that during hematopoietic regeneration, RNA expressed from a part of the genome considered 'junk DNA' is used by hematopoietic stem cells to get activated and proliferate. The study shows that these so-called transposable elements make RNA after chemotherapy and activate an immune receptor which induces inflammatory signals enhancing hematopoietic stem cell cycling and thus participating in the regeneration of the hematopoietic system.

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